Warrenmang winery

This series of images are from a recent weekend break up in the Victorian Pyrennes, staying at the Warrenmang winery and resort. The relaxing two night break began with us driving approximately two hours north west of Melbourne to the Moonambel Valley in central Victoria. This is a region renowned for its abundant treasure of superb food and wine, and on this occasion it most certainly did not disappoint. Although it was a two day holiday, I naturally packed my camera and several lenses but decided against bringing a tripod; something which I later regretted.

As usual I found myself taking many panoramic images of the sweeping vista’s – vineyards certainly seem to be the perfect subject matter and I tend to use the Canon 50mm f1.2L for the majority of the shots. This beautiful lens is particularly sharp at f8, and yields superb colour and contrast; because I tend to allow approximately 30% overlap between images that I plan on stitching together, I am also utilising the sharpest possible area, or ‘sweet spot’ of the lens in each panorama.

The image below was taken at dusk on the first night that we arrived; I have slightly increased the saturation in the RAW files to both match and do justice to the wonderful warm light cast by the setting sun, combined with the lovely purple hues in the sky  over the distant mountain range.

View from chalet at Warrenmang winery in the Victorian Pyrennes- © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
The view from Warrenmang winery at dusk – 16 image panoramic stitch – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

On this particular 145 acre vineyard, winemaker Luigi Bazzani grows Shiraz, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Dolcetto, Traminer and Chardonnay grapes, with the wine available for tasting and of course to accompany the excellent food at the onsite restaurant.

Warrenmang vineyard by moonlight  - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
After dinner and a small tipple, I decided it would be fun to try to capture the vineyard by moonlight…except that I had left my tripod back in Melbourne. Consequently I increased the ISO (hence the grain) and tried to steady the camera on a nearby post. The effects of the tiniest movement (and wine!) can be seen in this shot, but I still just liked the overall feel, despite the technical issues – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

Naturally enough due to the soil and meso-climate of long warm days and cool evenings in the region, Warrenmang is not the only vineyard in the area. As such, following a hearty breakfast we headed to nearby Dalwhinnie vineyard for a tasting. The following panorama is the view taken from the car park just before heading to the cellar door…

Dalwhinnie vineyard - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
At almost 600 metres above sea level, Dalwhinnie vineyard is apparently the highest and most remote vineyard in the region; this we learned after tasting and chatting with the very amiable winemaker David Jones. Needless to say the wines were fabulous! – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

While working as an architectural photographer, and while shooting panoramic images, I tend to make most of my images with an aperture of between f8 – f11; as such when I am out taking  pictures for my personal gratification I do enjoy shooting wide open with a nice shallow depth of field (many would argue that this is the only way to utilise the 50 f1.2 and the 85 f1.2 that I use..!) Each vineyard that we visited had an abundance of flowers waiting to be captured; in some cases the following images are quite heavily cropped from the original files, one of the benefits of a high resolution sensor.

Flowers at Warrenmang winery - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Warrenmang winery – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Warrenmang vineyard Flowers at Taltarni vineyard - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
More flowers at Warrenmang © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Warrenmang winery © Michael EVans Photographer 2014
Warrnemang winery © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Taltarni vineyard - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Not that you can tell of course, but the following two images were taken at Taltarni vineyard – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Taltarni vineyard - © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Flowers at Taltarni vineyard – © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

Stopping at Redbank winery for lunch, we sat in the warm sun while this gentleman played and sang a selection of classic songs…

Guitarist at Redbank winery © Michael Evans Photographer 2014 www.michaelevansphotographer.com
Great music while soaking up the sun at Redbank winery… © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Bugs on a rose © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Back to shooting with a shallow depth of field; this cropped image is with the 85 1.2L, and is perhaps 15% of the original file… © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

Following an extremely interesting Sunday morning tour of Warrenmang winery which was conducted by winemaker Luigi Bazzani himself, we had one last walk around the vines and in the process I captured the following panoramas.

Warrenmang winery panorama © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Warrenmang winery panorama © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Warrenmang winery panorama including the small lake © Michael Evans Photographer 2014
Warrenmang winery panorama including the small lake © Michael Evans Photographer 2014

Throughout the tour and subsequent tasting, Luigi explained the difference between the barrels used to age the wine, as well as how to feel the difference between a good and bad barrel. Watching him run his hands over the oak, the affection he had for these old friends was most apparent. After deciding prior to our trip that we were not going to severely limit our spending, we headed back to Melbourne having joined two wine clubs and with 26 bottles of wine in the boot. Definitely a weekend to be repeated…!

 

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